My Plan to Address Homelessness, Housing Affordability, and our Housing Crisis

Any given night, more than 11,000 of our neighbors are living without adequate shelter or accessible housing while experiencing homelessness and are in need of support and compassion. Homelessness is a tremendously complicated problem that demands a thorough, empathetic, and comprehensive approach if we’re going to make progress.

While King County has taken steps to mitigate this crisis, the response has been inadequate, and as a result, we see visible and visceral reminders daily of the intersecting challenges of accessible and affordable housing, income inequality, mental health, and addiction.

In 2015, over a decade after the “10 Year Plan to End Homelessness,” elected officials declared a state of emergency as cities across King County continued to see dramatic increases in neighbors sleeping in tents and in their cars. Since then, we have not seen the urgency, let alone the coordination, funding, services and housing, required to meaningfully address this crisis. 

My plan charts a course forward—ensuring King County is fulfilling its obligation to address the housing crisis, setting measurable objectives, and offering a collaborative vision so we can make real progress for our unsheltered neighbors while expanding programs proven to prevent and resolve homelessness.

And, as a renter, I would be the only person on the King County Council who is not a homeowner, offering a critical voice for working people that the Council is currently missing.

 

My immediate priorities for addressing this crisis are three fold:
  1. Acquire and transition under-utilized motels to transitional housing for our homeless neighbors, as we build a long-term vision for the Aurora corridor
  2. Immediately ramp up case management and diversion programs we know work
  3. Build for the future and finally plan our region’s regional housing future

 

First, King County, the City of Seattle, and Seattle Housing Authority must work to acquire and repurpose under-utilized motels for transitional housing for our neighbors experiencing homelessness. Here in District 4, Aurora Avenue is home to many motels with rooms that are already rented by homeless individuals, in a state of disrepair, or rented only hourly.

Doorbelling has helped me learn more about the experiences and challenges of individuals living along this corridor—and not just from conversations on Aurora. 

This summer while doorbelling in Queen Anne, I met a woman whose brother suffers from mental illness and has been homeless for the last two years. Josh sleeps in a sleeping bag on Stone Way, connecting with family once a week for a meal and a shower. Last winter, his family crowdfunded $10,000 to house him in a motel on Aurora for three months away from the cold, rain, and snow. 

The reality is, homeless neighbors are already living along Aurora, alternating between the street and any one of the area’s motels because they have nowhere else to go. By acquiring these buildings, we can better care for those in need and improve conditions for everyone who lives on or around Aurora Avenue.

These properties offer hundreds of rooms that could be used to immediately provide emergency transitional housing to our most vulnerable neighbors, including case management services.

This is a model that we know works: Catholic Community Services provides services in the Aloha Inn – and there is ample potential to transition run-down motels on Aurora and across King County for this same purpose.

Aurora Avenue has long been ignored by elected officials at all levels and is a patchwork of motels, car dealerships, and gas stations. My vision for this corridor is one of mixed income communities with walkable amenities like coffee shops, grocery stores, and retail space. Creating this Aurora will take leadership and attention—right now, too much of this area features recently re-paved roads but unsafe sidewalks, new large box storage buildings but not new housing or retail space that makes for vibrant communities. 

By buying and repurposing these hotels, and housing unsheltered people who already reside along Aurora Avenue, this proposal lays important groundwork for mapping out a much needed long term vision for the corridor. We can’t allow elected leaders to continue letting conditions on Aurora worsen, out of sight and out of mind. On the County Council, I’ll fight to build a community with mixed income development, walkable retail space, much needed sidewalk investments, and speed, reliability and safety improvements to the Rapid Ride E line.

Second, People who are experiencing homelessness are no more likely to commit crimes than any other resident of our county, yet there still remains a revolving door of crime and homelessness, at times exacerbated by issues of addiction and mental health. This is why we need meaningful criminal justice reform by further expanding the best-in-the-nation LEAD program across the county and better utilizing regional and municipal drug and mental health courts to meet demand.

Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) was piloted in the Belltown neighborhood between 2005 and 2011 and showed that when our law enforcement, prosecutors, public defenders and human services caseworkers come together to address low-level crimes we can see better outcomes. 

LEAD has been proven to be effective when the caseworkers serve 25 people, but given the demand in our communities it is closer to 40 clients per caseworker. It is imperative that King County is working with Seattle and the state to immediately provide adequate resources to continue this extremely effective program.

Third, no more funding of housing as an afterthought—we need a long-term, dedicated, and progressive revenue source to create affordable homes throughout King County. King County needs 244,000 units of low-income affordable housing by 2040 and about 56,000 units of low income housing now. Similar to our approach on Sound Transit 3, we need to make it a priority to develop a 20-year housing plan with meaningful funding mechanisms to meet our goals. 

There is no question that we need to take immediate action on increasing housing supply to reduce rent costs and address homelessness, as well as to defeat climate change. King County can’t sit on the sidelines; this regional government must be driving the solution to this regional problem, leading on funding and locating housing.

This plan is built around two main themes: meeting our growing housing needs and resolving and preventing homelessness.

 

For King County to meaningfully address this crisis we must:

Meet Our Growing Housing Needs: 
  • Build Housing Now
    • There are more than 4,000 affordable homes ready to begin construction. We must immediately source funding for this shovel-ready low-income and permanent supportive housing.
  • Principled Zoning and Equitable Transit Oriented Development
    • Build and plan for housing around transit hubs to create connected communities.
    • Develop affordable housing on County-owned surplus land. King County owns over 1,100 acres of vacant and underutilized land. The County should study selling this land at a discounted rate or offering land-leases for affordable housing development.
    • Ensure communities around transit are affordable, are not at risk of displacement, and are thriving, with walkable, bikeable neighborhoods and hyper-local economic opportunity.
  • Real Affordable Housing Options through “Gentle Density”
    • Partner with cities to create land use policies that support transit-oriented development and missing middle housing across King County.
    • Encourage the development of duplexes, triplexes, and stacked flats or townhouses that can all provide family sized housing that is also affordable.
    • Legalize and incentivize the construction of mother-in-law apartments and backyard cottages across King County. King County must work with cities to create pre-approved plans for such accessory dwelling units, making it easier and more affordable for communities to build new homes.
    • Create incentives and make it easier to fund community land trusts and co-op housing.
  • Navigate the Vast Options for Funding Housing
    • No more funding of housing as an afterthought—we need a long-term, dedicated, and progressive revenue source to create affordable homes throughout King County.
    • Immediately take advantage of bonding capacity and begin financing new, affordable, and community centered housing.
    • Fully explore existing revenue options and fight for new, progressive sources in Olympia to fund housing and fix our broken tax system.
    • Put a ‘Home Fund’ measure on the ballot to generate $75 million a year for affordable housing through King County’s .01% sales tax capacity.
    • Hold businesses accountable in paying a fair share toward solving the housing crisis.
    • Innovate our county’s housing solutions by advancing the good work of the Veterans, Seniors, and Human Services Levy that uses dollars to fund innovative housing solutions including master-leasing and deep, rental subsidies.

 

Resolving and Preventing Homelessness: 
  • Enact Eviction Reform
    • Help families stay in place by establishing a right to legal counsel for tenants facing eviction. Tenants facing eviction who have legal counsel are twice as likely to remain in their homes as those who do not. 
    • Create a centralized agency for providing emergency funding that would be a cost-effective way to help keep people in their homes.
  • Implement Criminal Justice Reform
    • People who are experiencing homelessness are no more likely to commit crimes than any other resident of our County. 
    • Expand LEAD countywide and promote other methods of diversion, rather than just sending people to jail.
    • Reform the inequitable cash bail system so low-income people and people of color who can’t afford bail aren’t stuck in jail awaiting trial, sometimes for months or years.
    • Create an integrated support system for people reentering the community after incarceration. Our region should be intentionally granting contracts to companies that hire people exiting incarceration and work on additional ban-the-box initiatives. 
  • Scale Public Health Services
    • Provide shelter and access to public health facilities for those experiencing homelessness.
    • Ensure we’re providing adequate access to much needed addiction and mental health treatment service.
    • Pay caseworkers a fair wage and provide adequate funding for more caseworkers, so they can give adequate attention to a focused number of clients.
  • Reduce Barriers to Accessing Homes
    • Create modern and county-wide policies for rental applications that protect tenants, make it easier to find appropriate housing.
    • Fully fund King County’s diversion program, which assists people exiting homelessness with move-in costs. 
    • Utilize the King County Regional Access Points (RAPs) to effectively connect people to housing and community resources.
    • Increase funding for tenant-based voucher programs that provide rental assistance for low-income residents.  
  • Proactively Prevent Displacement
    • Create County-wide affirmative marketing for new affordable housing units. We need to ensure that our neighbors are aware of the affordable homes being created and enable them to stay in the neighborhoods of their choice. 
    • Fairly compensate the workers building our housing and the caseworkers supporting our most vulnerable neighbors. Those helping address our housing crisis should not be dealing with housing instability themselves.
    • Partner with the City of Seattle to provide economic development assistance to small businesses throughout King County.

 

The King County Council must be more engaged on this crisis and truly treat it as such. The response so far has not been adequate, and with resources from King County, cities across the county, and countless nonprofits all going toward homelessness and affordable housing, it is our responsibility to truly coordinate and lead this effort. 

I am excited about the creation of the new entity, the King County Regional Homelessness Authority, and look forward to ensuring that it is truly an effective and efficient regional entity. While, this entity has the potential to be an important effort to coordinate our homelessness response more effectively across our region, it does not add additional tools or resources to expand our much needed housing capacity or expand investments in programs that have been proven to be effective at preventing and intervening in homelessness. 

There are clear steps we should already be taking to help unsheltered and at risk neighbors, including eviction reform, accessible services, criminal justice reform that includes adequate re-entry support, and reducing barriers to accessing housing. The County also needs leaders focusing on preventing displacement and lessening the regressive nature of our tax system.

The King County Council must be leading the development of a bold funding plan to build much needed homes for low income households, clear pathways to housing, while expanding needed wrap-around support services to help our neighbors in need. As a region, we’ve led on building the regional transportation and growth management entities, but we do not have a regional plan  that directly resources and coordinates our growing housing needs across the income spectrum.  

We need new coalitions to empower those who have been doing this work for decades.  Working together, we can achieve effective management and truly reach our ambitious but manageable goals based on evidence and on a long-term plan; as we’ve seen, the status quo just will not get us where we need to go.

 

Read my full plan below: 

Meeting Our Growing Housing Needs

Now, and in the future, we need more housing, period. 

Currently, King County does not have a financing plan to meet our housing needs. Similar to our approach on Sound Transit 3, we need to make it a priority to develop a 20-year housing plan with meaningful funding mechanisms to meet our goals. 

There is no question that we need to take immediate action on increasing housing supply to reduce rent costs and address homelessness, as well as to defeat climate change. King County can’t sit on the sidelines; this regional government must be driving the solution to this regional problem, leading on funding and locating housing.

King County needs 244,000 units of low-income affordable housing by 2040 and about 56,000 units of low income housing now

We also need to build supportive housing, giving individuals experiencing homelessness a place to stay with access to the support services they need to transition from homelessness to permanent housing. A housing first agenda is the only way to ensure unsheltered neighbors get help and makes progress on this issue. This is an immediate need and an integral part of a homelessness solution.

We already have 4,000 affordable homes ready to begin construction. We must immediately source funding for this shovel-ready low-income and permanent supportive housing. 

 

Where to Build: Principled Zoning and Transit Oriented Development

Job growth is a good thing. As our County continues to see rapid growth in good paying jobs, we must also be focused on planning to ensure that households of all income levels have access to housing near transit, parks, and schools. Expanding housing diversity across King County without encroaching on farmlands and critical habitats is a vital component of not only ensuring more families have access to affordable homes, but to expanding homeownership opportunities, and reducing the cost to produce permanently affordable homes. 

Talking with residents, I often hear about anxiety associated with developers more concerned with making a quick buck than investing in the community. As we work with cities to make density and upzoning decisions, the County Council must develop strong standards that ensure existing communities have access to this new housing (rather than being pushed out by it) and that it’s actually meeting affordability needs for middle-income households.

We must be working diligently to identify public land that could be used for affordable housing and offer the land to affordable housing development at free or greatly reduced cost. One of the main pillars of my climate action plan is to approach development with a climate lens, building around transit hubs to reduce the number of cars on the road and centrally locate businesses, goods, and services.

King County owns over 1,100 acres of vacant and underutilized land. We should be thinking about either selling this land at a discounted rate or offering land-leases for affordable housing development.


Last year, Sound Transit passed strong Equitable Transit Oriented Development policies by prioritizing and requiring properties owned by Sound Transit around transit stations to be first offered to affordable housing providers for free or at greatly reduced costs. While the policy is strong, ongoing proactive engagement from elected officials and advocates as Sound Transit is built out (and as existing land is surplussed) is necessary to ensure we are intentionally developing around transit hubs and preventing further displacement.

 

What to Build: Real Affordable Housing Options through “Gentle Density”

King County’s most immediate need to address the housing crisis is permanent supportive housing. By building housing units where unsheltered neighbors have access to support services, can store their belongings, and keep their pets, King County can implement a housing first approach, a proven method for making real progress on homelessness.

When it comes to affordable housing, there are a number of “gentle density” options we should pursue to build the “missing middle” of housing. Duplexes, triplexes, stacked townhouses, and accessory dwelling units (ADU’s) can all provide family sized housing that is also affordable. Rather than only building large apartment buildings, these missing middle options add density and affordability that don’t disrupt existing neighborhoods. And, they offer an opportunity for local property owners and contractors to financially gain and thrive, not just out of state investors and large development companies.

In District 4, I hear time and again residents desire to allow ADUs, attached family housing, and stacked flats as part of a suite of policies that meet the needs of new families and seniors looking to downsize while staying in their neighborhoods. We need to take these reforms to the county level and need to make it easier for people to build by providing pre-approved plans for accessory dwelling units.

Community land trusts and co-op housing are also methods of keeping housing affordable and accessible for working people. By empowering housing development by community run nonprofits, we can create community land trusts that ensure housing is always affordable. Co-ops allow groups of residents in light density housing to each own a share of the building they call home. This opens up a new, equitable option for home ownership and affordable housing.

Lastly, we must create the tools and incentives that encourage King County’s local jurisdictions to adopt these affordable housing solutions. Our region’s need for affordable housing extends beyond King County, and we need a County Council who is making that clear to all of our cities.

 

How to Build: Navigate the Vast Options for Funding Housing

There is housing that is ready to be built, it just needs funding now.

The King County Council faces an incredibly complex equation for determining how to approach funding the solutions to our housing crisis, but we should not be mired in indecision and inertia when we have the potential to fund our housing needs.

Holding meetings to discuss homelessness ad nauseam while people continue to die in our streets is unacceptable.

Our County Councilmember must be engaged, active, and innovative – willing to build coalitions, explore new options, and take on difficult fights for a better result. I am ready to lead on this issue.

I was pleased to see the King County Council take advantage of the legislature’s HB 1406, but it’s not nearly enough. We need to generate at least $400 million a year if we’re going to build an adequate supply of affordable housing to meet the needs of all our neighbors.

Similar to the Sustainable County Funding for Greater Local Transit section of my transportation plan, the County Council has a number of revenue options at their disposal to fund housing and the platform to advocate for more progressive options. And, even though there is a clear and apparent need for more revenue to fund housing, the Council has not thoroughly reviewed the advantages and disadvantages of each option or made sufficient effort in Olympia to develop new and progressive sources.

King County has the ability to utilize bonding capacity to generate significant revenue that can finance and build affordable housing. We must immediately take advantage of this bonding capacity and begin financing new, affordable, community centered housing. 

King County also currently has .01% sales tax capacity, often referred to as “the Home Fund,” that is not currently being used. If enacted, this would generate $75 million per year. We must immediately compile a ballot measure for the Home Fund, and give voters the opportunity to invest in what works: permanent supportive housing, tenant-based vouchers, rapid re-housing, diversion and law assisted diversion.

But, as mentioned, we can no longer rely only on regressive funding measures, which perpetuate and drive further economic inequality and hurt our ultimate goals. This is why, as your County Council Member, I will work tirelessly to push for a more equitable tax system.  

When I led the campaign for Sound Transit 3, we organized and relentlessly used all of our political might to address an issue that should have been tackled decades earlier: We identified a long term need and rolled up our sleeves to do the hard work to map out the funding and revenue needs, obtained authority from the legislature, and then worked hard to get voter approval. That is the same commitment and approach I will bring to this issue as a County Councilmember.

King County is home to some of the most valuable and profitable companies in the world—and they need to adequately contribute to the affordable housing solution. I am energized by activism like Microsoft’s, which has pledged $500 million to this effort, but I am also disheartened that our current County Council fails to demonstrate the political courage to hold other businesses accountable on an issue where we all have so much on the line. The Microsoft Fund is proving that Impact Investing can work to create permanently affordable homes for middle-income households, and expanding revenue into these funds means we can focus tax dollars on the lowest-income families, and housing for individuals who are exiting chronic homelessness.

 

Resolving and Preventing Homelessness

Resolving current homelessness is the moral requirement at our current time. And the best way to prevent homelessness is to keep people in their homes from the start. King County can no longer be just ‘reactive’ to homelessness—we must be urgent, bold and proactive: keeping people where they live and, for those already experiencing homelessness, we need to make our housing more affordable, accessible and with services that make this housing more available and better tailored to specific needs.

Here’s how we do it: 

There are many barriers to accessing housing that go beyond just the cost of rent. Challenges with mental health, addiction, and a broken criminal justice system have made it more difficult for too many to access permanently affordable homes. We need to maintain strong public health services, connect homeless individuals to those services, and coordinate with providers, cities, and individuals to make sure needs are actually being met.

 

Enact Eviction Reform 

Too many in King County are living paycheck to paycheck, and, at any given time, are at risk of losing their housing. Eviction is one of the main drivers of homelessness and housing instability. Washington state have taken steps to reform the eviction process and give people additional opportunities to stay where they live. Seattle has implemented important tenant protections, including Just Cause eviction laws and regulations limiting move-in fees. It’s time to leverage King County’s lawmaking capabilities to require the same kind of thoughtful reform across the region. 

The majority of evictions in King County are for owing less than one month’s rent. Evictions can directly lead to homelessness and prior eviction judgements are a major barrier to finding housing. Right now, tenants needing rental assistance have to navigate a labyrinthine social services system spread amongst more than two dozen providers. We should look at establishing a right to legal counsel for tenants facing eviction, and consider a centralized agency for providing emergency funding that would be a cost-effective way to help keep people in their homes. 

 

Implement Criminal Justice Reform, Scale Public Health Services, and Reduce Barriers to Housing

People who are experiencing homelessness are no more likely to commit crimes than any other resident of our county, yet there still remains a revolving door of crime and homelessness, at times exacerbated by issues of addiction and mental health. This is why we need meaningful criminal justice reform by further expanding the best-in-the-nation LEAD program across the county and better utilizing regional and municipal drug and mental health courts to meet demand.

Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) was piloted in the Belltown neighborhood between 2005 and 2011 and showed that when our law enforcement, prosecutors, public defenders and human services caseworkers come together to address low-level crimes we can see better outcomes. 

LEAD has been proven to be effective when the caseworkers serve 25 people, but given the demand in our communities it is closer to 40 clients per caseworker. It is imperative that King County is working with Seattle and the state to provide adequate resources to continue this extremely effective program.

In addition, to ensure that case management is the most effective for LEAD and all of our human services, we must also address low wages and subsequent retention issues for social service workers. We know that wages are low for this sector while workers conduct some of our community’s most important work. Importantly, the Veterans, Seniors, and Human Services Levy included funding to conduct a wage survey for levy-funded social service workers. Again, while this is important, we need to move beyond a survey and work collectively at addressing inequitable wages for some of our community’s most valuable workers.  

Jail should not be a temporary—or permanent—housing option. In addition to utilizing LEAD as a resource to close the revolving door of crime and jail, we must also reform our bail system, as to prevent low income people (often people of color) from being stuck in jail when they can’t afford arbitrary and expensive bail costs.

And, after someone has served their time or completed diversion programming, we can’t let past criminal behavior stand in the way of future housing. We must work on further “ban-the-box” initiatives that create an equal playing field for all members of our community.

While LEAD has produced many successful outcomes, housing remains a tremendous barrier. Affordable and accessible housing is a challenge for LEAD participants, people with disabilities, those with fixed-incomes, and those experiencing chronic homelessness. 

Currently, our county-wide system of Coordinated Entry for All is what connects someone experiencing homelessness to a housing resource. Service providers have continuously echoed the challenges with the current system and national experts, like Barb Poppe, have called for a systems transformation. We need to further utilize the County’s Regional Access Points and effectively connect people to housing and community resources.

Working with tenants and landlords both, we can create modern and county-wide policies for rental applications that protect tenants, make it easier to find appropriate housing, and ensure a stable, long-term housing arrangements.

 

Living Where You Work: Ensuring Fair Compensation for Workers

It is critical that we ensure that the workers who are building our housing and our caseworkers addressing the homelessness crisis are compensated fairly and given the benefits and support systems needed so that they can afford to live in our communities. Those helping our most vulnerable neighbors find housing should not be dealing with housing instability themselves.

 


 

Homelessness and affordable housing are the issues that District 4 residents are seeing, feeling, and thinking about. They’re the issues I hear about most frequently on the doors, and they’re the issues I’m committed to addressing on the County Council.

We’ve all watched these dual crises develop over the last several years, and instead of seeing meaningful progress or urgent action to address them, they’ve only worsened.

Many of these policies could have already been in the works, and as County Councilmember, I’ll recognize the leverage I have to make progress and move quickly.

The time is now to act on homelessness and build affordable housing—our county and our neighbors cannot afford any further delay.

The Urbanist
The Urbanist’s August Primary Endorsements 2019

The Urbanist endorses Abigail Doerr for King County Council District 4. Doerr’s do-er energy and transportation and climate expertise makes her a strong urbanist leader. Doerr successfully led the Mass Transit Now campaign in 2016, securing $54 billion for light rail, bus rapid transit, andRead More

SeattlePI
Young Democrats back challengers to Sawant, Kohl-Welles and Gossett

The Young Democrats would pump new blood into what has been an often-ignored, albeit well paid King County Council. They voted to endorse Abigail Doerr, a 29-year-old challenger to 77-year-old incumbent King County Council member Jeanne Kohl-Welles. Kohl-Welles previously served for more thanRead More

The Seattle Times
Transit advocate Abigail Doerr running for King County Council

Doerr said she wants to work to find a new funding source for bus service in King County. The Seattle Transportation Benefit District, which funds about $45 million a year of bus service in the city, expires in 2020. Doerr has worked in local politics since 2014, when she managed successfulRead More

Denver Streets Blog
To Raise Funds for Transit, Denver Can Follow the Lead of Seattle and LA

“One of the common pieces of push-back we got is that transit is a shiny nice-to-have, not a must-have,” said Abigail Doerr, who helped get the Seattle region’s tax passed as advocacy director for Transportation Choices Coalition. “We had to make sure that we were making the case that thisRead More

The Urbanist
Sunday Video: The Seattle Streetcar

In this video, advocacy director Abigail Doerr from Transportation Choices Coalition talks about the benefits of the Seattle Streetcar and in particular how the Center City Connector will improve the system.Read More

Mass Transit
A Major Transit Victory in the Puget Sound

This has been an excellent start, but it is not enough to meet the demands of the region. To plan for the growth that we are expecting and the traffic congestion we are experiencing, Sound Transit leadership spent three years developing the next phase of expansion fighting political battles toRead More

The Seattle Times
Angle Lake Station Opening

Abigail Doerr, manager of the Mass Transit Now (pro-ST3) campaign, said in a debate this week the station is opening four years early. That’s based on goals from the 2008 ST2 campaign. Back in the Sound Move campaign of 1996, Angle Lake service was promised by 2006, but severely flawed costRead More

KBCS
Unmute the Commute: Sound Transit 3 Ballot Measure

With a national election approaching, voters are weighing some key issues. For Puget Sound area residents, a major transportation initiative will be decided. If approved, Sound Transit 3 will expand and improve local transit. Jennie Cecil Moore interviewed Abigail Doerr, Advocacy Director of Read More

Capitol Hill Seattle Blog
ST3: a Capitol Hill view of what’s next for Sound Transit

For local transit advocates like Abigail Doerr, advocacy director for the pro-light rail Transportation Choices Coalition and a Capitol Hill resident, ST3 is a key opportunity to get it right to go all out and build out the regional mass transit network to its fullest extent. “We would like toRead More

Seattle Central College
Washington Bus: YOUth Powered Democracy

Video recording of a forum hosted by the Washington Bus to facilitate a conversation on how the barriers to access, the opportunity gap, and existing political culture keep young people out from engaging in politics.Read More

Thank you so much for your support in my campaign! While our efforts didn’t result in a win — I am so proud that I decided to run to elevate the issues that motivated me to run: climate, housing, and transit. I am so grateful for all of you who came along this journey and donated, endorsed, doorbelled, and cheered us on!
Many young women have approached me this year about running for office and I'll say it again: please run! Fight for the community you love, challenge the status quo, run competitive races, knock on doors, present bold policy and big ideas, bring others along with you and let’s lay the groundwork for a future for all of us. Some races are an uphill battle. But by taking risks to make bold change, in the process you do so much for your community. You will be stronger for it and more determined for whatever is next!
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I stuck my ballot in the mail today. Have you voted yet?! I voted: ✅Yes on I-1000/R-88 ❌ No on 976 AND I filled in the bubble next to Abigail Doerr 🗳!! Get those ballots filled out and returned by Nov 5th. ...

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We are walking fast! Who is ready for: ✅ regional solutions on homelessness
✅ urgent action on climate
✅ improvements to our transit system

Let's go do it together!
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Ballots should be arriving in your mailbox!! We had a great crew on the doors last weekend AND we have reached our 35,000th door of the campaign. #doerrtodoor Let’s do this!! ...

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Many thanks to the crew from the #43rdDems for hitting the pavement with us this crisp Saturday morning! Special appearance by some sleepy pups. ...

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